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Hall Of Fame

Abdullahi Hussein Ali (Former PhD student, UW)

Abdullahi Hussein Ali (Former PhD student, UW)

Besides the guy in the Dos Equis commercials, Abdullahi Hussein Ali might be the most interesting man in the world (we're biased, of course!). Fluent in four languages, Ali was born to a household of 13 brothers and sisters on the Kenya-Somali border. At the age of eight, he first set foot in a permanent structure, a schoolhouse that his uncle--then the Chief of General Staff of the Kenya Defence Forces--built with funds from the president as a reward for suppressing a military coup.

Ali's dissertation focused on the range collapse, demography, and conservation of hirola, a critically endangered antelope confined to a swath of unprotected land in eastern Kenya. As a graduate student, Ali founded the Hirola Conservation Program, dedicated to protecting hirola and their habitats in their native range.

Adam Ford (former PhD student, UBC)

Adam Ford (former PhD student, UBC)

Adam "AKA All Terrain, AKA Aboot Toque, AKA Alcohol-Tobacco-Firearms" Ford completed a Liber Ero postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Guelph, before joining the faculty at the University of British Columbia Okanagan as a Canada Research Chair.

We have many fond and unusual memories of Adam. These include, but are not limited to, a Hazzard county-esque chase ending unceremoniously with bout of pink eye, a dustup with the Kenyan Ministry of Fisheries Development, and a tense situation involving a dying rabbit call, a leopard, and an unspeakable amount of mud. He will be missed mightily, and we don't mean perhaps.

Amos Kibara (former research technician, Ijara)

Amos Kibara (former research technician, Ijara)

Amos Muthee Kibara worked as the lead technician for Ali's field work on hirola conservation in Ijara, Kenya. He joined our group from the Mount Kenya Conservancy where he helped manage a captive breeding program for highland bongos. We are glad Amos sacrificed personal comfort to trade the balmy foothills of Mount Kenya for the blistering heat of Ijara for this work! He continues to serve as coordinator of field conservation for the Hirola Conservation Program.
Brendan Oates (former MSc Student, UW)

Brendan Oates (former MSc Student, UW)

Brendan "AKA Husky, AKA Boatesy" Oates recently completed a top-notch thesis, co-advised by Matt Kauffman and Jake, disentangling predation from bottom-up factors (drought and fire) in driving anti-predator behavior and vital rates of Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi). And he recently landed a primo gig, working as a research biologist for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

Brendan will be remembered fondly for his rigourous approach to wildlife ecology, passion for fieldwork, killer garlic bread, and formidable beard. He and Jake share an inordinate, borderline creepy fondness for Pearl Jam, and Star Wars.

Bridget Conneely (former MSc student, UBC)

Bridget Conneely (former MSc student, UBC)

Bridget Conneely earned her MSc with Jake through the University of British Columbia in 2011. Through the Gorongosa Restoration Project, Bridget worked to understand the influence of fire on resource selection by buffalo and wildebeest recently reintroduced to Gorongosa National Park. Bridget is now working for the Wildlife Conservation Society's Toronto office.
Ceicil Otieno (former GIS technician, Mpala)

Ceicil Otieno (former GIS technician, Mpala)

Ceicil Otieno conducted his student attachment with us from the Kenya Institute of Surveying and Mapping. Under the wise tutelage of George Aike, Ceicil worked to tile, mosaic, georeference, and classify over 400 aerial photos of Mpala and neighboring ranches in Laikipia.
Christian Bopp (former research technician, Ol Pejeta Conservancy)

Christian Bopp (former research technician, Ol Pejeta Conservancy)

Christian Bopp (right) worked with Caroline on Ol Pejeta Conservancy to characterize the determinants of lion kill-sites. Currently, he is working as a Peace Corps volunteer in Paraguay. In this photo, Christian is simulating the role of a poacher (who typically wear oversized puffy blue coveralls), thereby enticing a special forces dog to gnaw on his arm.
Clint Atkinson (former research technician, UW)

Clint Atkinson (former research technician, UW)

Clint Atkinson worked with us as a technician on the statewide moose project. From humble beginnings sorting moose kidneys under the watchful eye of Brett Jesmer, he now works in the enviable position of large carnivore biologist for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department out of Lander, Wyoming. Way to go Clint; mind those ursids.

Corinna Riginos (former Berry postdoctoral fellow, UW)

Corinna Riginos (former Berry postdoctoral fellow, UW)

Corinna Riginos is a freelance biologist extraordinaire in Jackson, managing the KLEE experiment, working as an environmental consultant, and rapidly becoming the state's go-to expert on deer-vehicle collisions (all while raising two super-adorable kids). Despite working as a postdoctoral associate in our group for a tragically short period of time, we often claim credit for her professional success in the company of folks who don’t know any better. Good luck up there Corinna!

Janet Maclean (former MSc student, UBC)

Janet Maclean (former MSc student, UBC)

Janet Maclean earned her MSc with Jake and Roy Turkington through the University of British Columbia in 2012 and is now a PhD student at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. Janet’s work demonstrated a heretofore unappreciated and (dare we state) pretty darned cool phenomenon: seed and seedling consumption by rodents had effects comparable to those of large ungulates on the demography of a monodominant savanna tree. Chalk one up for the charismatic microfauna!

Megan Dudenhoeffer (former research technician, Mpala)

Megan Dudenhoeffer (former research technician, Mpala)

Megan "AKA Doogie, AKA Olivia Newton John Marianne" Dudenhoeffer worked with Anne-Marie to characterize seed predators of the invasive prickly-pear cactus in Laikipia. Soon, she will commence graduate studies at the University of Manitoba, studying interactions between red and arctic fox. Here, she deftly wrangles a Hinde's bush rat like it was her job.
Rhiannon Jakopak (former UHURU project manager, Mpala)

Rhiannon Jakopak (former UHURU project manager, Mpala)

As the kids tweet these days, Rhiannon Jakopak oversaw UHURU like a boss in 2016. She conducted independent work with Jake on dispersal limitation as an alternative to Brown's resource breadth hypothesis. Rhiannon will begin graduate studies at the University of Wyoming in 2017, working on dispersal and population genetics of mule deer. In this photo, she is handling one of two four-toed hedgehogs captured in UHURU, ever, with equal parts trepidation and exuberance.
Simon Lima (former research technician, Mpala)

Simon Lima (former research technician, Mpala)

Simon Lima (pictured here after a trying stint in Tsavo National Park) was an invaluable member of our research team between 2004 and 2015. He is a guru with GPS, ungulate captures, and radio-telemetry, and he can spot giraffes at over 500 km (pun intended, to be sure). And he's the proud father of two of the cutest kids in Laikipia. He will be missed dearly.

Stephen Kinyua (former MSc student, Moi U)

Stephen Kinyua (former MSc student, Moi U)

Stephen Kinyua was the inaugural project leader on the UHURU small-mammal sampling. Steve was advised by Jake and Paul Webala at Moi University and now serves as a Project Manager for Wildlife Cybercrime for the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

Tobias Otieno (former MSc student, Karatina U)

Tobias Otieno (former MSc student, Karatina U)

Tobias Otieno earned his MSc in Wildlife Management at Moi University in Kenya, coadvised by Paul Webala and Jake, with lots of collaboration with Adam. Toby worked to understand how the perceived risk of predation affects diet selectivity of impala and Guenther's dik-dik, two abundant ungulates throughout Laikipia. He is now Research Manager for Ewaso Lions in Samburu County.